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Pleasanton council authenticates the renewable energy proposition

The City Council of Pleasanton decided to approve the renewable energy plan enabling residents to enjoy the option of shifting to carbon-free electricity. The East Bay Community Energy (EBCE) was vital in presenting the service levels to facilitate renewable energy provision. Mayor Karla Brown stated that it was essential to offer the residents an alternative source of energy that is in line with the measures to combat climate change resulting from the consumption of fossil fuels. Municipal accounts of Pleasanton will enjoy the services of Renewable 100. The residents and businesses will work with Brilliant 100, while the customers on CARE or FERA medical programs will have to do with Bright Choice. The category in which the customer falls will determine the cost of their power, which may be less, equal, or more than that from PG&E service.

Bright Choice’s quality is about 38% renewable energy, 85% carbon-free energy rates, and about 2% less than PG&E. On the other hand, Brilliant 100 operates at 40% renewable energy with 100% carbon-free energy keeping at balanced levels with PG&E. Finally; Renewable 100 offers 100% renewable energy with 100% carbon-free energy superseding the levels posted by PG&E. Pleasanton decided to link with EBCE because of the clean and renewable electricity that the agency provided to the citizens dwelling in San Joaquin and Alameda counties.

Mayor Brown stated that the unveiling of EBCE catapults the city towards the realization of the Climate Action Plan 2.0 that requires the city to be carbon neutral in the next 14 years. Customers have the opportunity to receive electricity from EBCE starting April with the provision of changing to a higher or a lower level depending on the customer’s financial capability. Moreover, the option of receiving electricity from PG&E is open to the customers because the utility will continue to provide grid maintenance services, power delivery, and a billing system.

The public relations manager of EBCE, Alex DiGiorgio, explained that customers would be allowed to change their service levels as long as they keep their billing cycle in order. However, some legal circumstances would bar the customer from switching to EBCE until a year passes before becoming eligible again. This restriction has been placed to prevent the unlawful transition to another service level without informing the authorities and breaching their agreement. The Pleasanton City officials stated that more details would be provided in the course of rolling out the EBCE program. Any path that the consumers choose would have implications that they would have to live with until the billing cycle comes to an end.

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